Category Archives: Museums

Alice Moseley Folk Art and Antique Museum, Old Town Bay St. Louis

If you like antiques, if you like art, if you like resilient Southern women, if you like museums, or if you simply like to enjoy yourself, then you will definitely like the Alice Moseley Folk Art and Antique Museum that is located in the Train Depot in Old Town Bay St. Louis.

Alice Moseley is a well-known folk artist who resided in Old Town.  She did not begin her artistic career until the age of 65, and she lived to be 94 years young.

The museum is home to 45 of her paintings that she left to the people of Bay St. Louis.  The paintings are not for sale, but prints of her paintings are available for purchase at the museum.  Also housed in the museum are furnishings from her home, located across the street, and Tim Moseley’s 35-year-old collection of majolica, art pottery, art glass, and other collectibles.

The Friend of the Alice Moseley Museum recently dedicated a new pavilion on the grounds of the Depot and announced that a new folk art festival honoring Miss Alice is being created.

Miss Alice’s blue house, as mentioned, is across the street from the museum and is available rent as a vacation cottage.

The museum is open Monday through Saturday, 10 a.m.-4 p.m.  Admission is free.

For more information, you can call the museum at 228.457.9223 or click HERE to go to the museum’s website.

This museum is one of those not-to-miss items on any list!

Katrina Recovery Quilts

Solveig Wells was a master quiltmaker who had a second home on the Coast before Katrina.  When that home was lost, so was Solveig’s extensive collection of fabrics.

Months later, many of the fabric’s in her collection were found on the beach weathered, frayed, and still wet.

To read Solveig’s amazing story of recovery and see photos of some of the 55 quilts she made from her destroyed fabric collection, click here.

The quilts were donated to the Ground Zero Hurricane Museum following Solveig’s death in 2013.  As of this writing, the Museum undergoing repairs and is not open but you can still read Solveig’s inspiring story on their website.

Waveland’s Colorful History

While browsing the City of Waveland’s website, I ran across the “About Waveland” tab that contains some incredible information about  “The Hospitality City”.

While one can look at Beach Boulevard and notice the absence of commercialization but not know that Waveland is the only city on the Gulf Coast which prohibits commercial buildings on its beachfront.  Good for them!  That certainly makes Beach Boulevard all the more charming and inviting, a quiet retreat.

Originally part of Shieldsboro, which is now Bay St. Louis, Waveland became a separate municipality in 1888 and a city in 1970.  Coleman Avenue has endured destruction twice:  once by Hurricane Camille in 1969 and again by Hurricane Katina in 2005.  But Coleman Avenue is slowly coming back as are houses on the beach.

What is now the Ground Zero Museum started out as the Civic Center and was the only building left standing on Coleman Avenue following Hurricane Katrina.  It is home to a hand-cranked carousel that was donated to Waveland after Katrine by the people of Port Townsend Washington.

Many interesting details about the history of Waveland can be found on this website and I encourage you to visit and read all about Waveland’s storied past!

 

Historic Sights to See in Old Town Bay St. Louis

Bay St. Louis is one of the oldest cities in South Mississippi, established over 300 years ago in 1699 and was originally named Shieldsboro, after a ship’s purser named Thomas Shields.  Renamed in 1818 to the current name, Bay St. Louis was slated to be the first state capital but lost out to Natchez, which, shortly thereafter, lost out to Jackson.  What wasn’t lost to Jackson was the area’s charm and affinity for the arts.

Bay St. Louis has the distinction of being home to artists, sets for movies, and some of the oldest, most historic buildings in Mississippi.   Among the buildings are:

  • The 1899 Hancock Bank Building (the oldest two-story building in the city) located at 100 S. Beach Blvd;
  • The 1925 Masonic Temple Building at 125 Main Street, a neo-classic Revival style building;
  • The 1911 Hancock County Courthouse at 150 Main Street, the tallest building in Old Town;
  • 1880’s The Louis Piernas House, 202 S. Toulme St, home to a “free man of color”;
  • The Train Depot, 1928 Depot Way, two-story mission style depot built in 1928 and famously served as a set in “This Property is Condemned”;
  • The Queen Anne style home located at 398 Blaize Ave. was built in 1916, and is was the centerpiece of the movie “This Property is Condemned House“, based on a play by Tennessee Williams.  This building is now the home of the Bay St. Louis Little Theater.
  • One of the most well-known artists from Bay St, Louis was Alice Moseley.  Ms. Moseley began her artistic career at age 60 and lived to be 94.  The Alice Moseley House is located at 214 Bookter Street.

Many more historic and stunning buildings abound in Bay St. Louis.  The best place to go for information is to the Depot Visitor’s Center.  This building also houses the Alice Moseley Museum, the Mardi Gras Museum, and the Hancock County Tourism Development Bureau.

Enjoy getting to know Bay St. Louis!

Hancock County History and Pirates!!!

 

The Hancock County Historical Society in Bay St. Louis, founded in 1977,  is a very active organization, researching and preserving the long and storied history of Hancock County.  The Society has amassed thousands of documents and photographs to be gathered into a computerized database with wide availability.  These documents and photographs have been collected from churches, schools, magazines, newspapers,  local authors,  city archives, the county and many other sources.

To begin your foray into the fascinating and sometimes colorful history of Hancock County, please check out the Historical Society’s website, http://www.hancockcountyhistoricalsociety.com/, visit their offices at 108 Cue Street, Bay St. Louis, or call 228.467.4090.

The following link to a brief outline of Hancock County’s history will certainly whet your appetite and motivate you to learn more about what has happened here, when it happened, and who was involved.  http://www.hancockcountyhistoricalsociety.com/history/hancockcounty.htm

Add to this article the following articles about the famous “Pirate House” and Jean Lafitte and you will be hooked on this organization and the history of Hancock County!  The Pirate House was located at 649 North Beach Boulevard, Waveland MS.

 

The Pirate House and Jean Lafitte http://www.hancockcountyhistoricalsociety.com/history/lafittepirate.htm

The Pirate House Revisited http://www.hancockcountyhistoricalsociety.com/history/lafittepirate-part2.htm

Enjoy your Journey!!!

Biloxi Visitors Center

Located at 1050 Beach Boulevard at U. S. 90 and Porter Avenue, the Biloxi Visitors Center is a newly-constructed, 24,000 square foot facility built to resemble the Dantzler House.  The Dantzler House, which was built in 1849, originally stood on this site and was destroyed by Hurricane Katrina on August 29, 2005.

Information about visitor amenities in Biloxi are available at the Center, which is also a small museum of exhibits telling the story of Biloxi, one of the oldest cities in the United States.  A gift shop is available in addition to a 67-seat movie theater continuously showing a 10-minute film “We Are Biloxi”.  Additionally, the center is available for private parties or corporate functions and is home to the Biloxi and Biloxi Bay Chambers of Commerce.

Stop by from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily or call 228.374.3105 for more information.  Admission is free.